Maurizio Nannucci's largest permanent work ever in Italy arrives at Parma's Pilotta


The Complesso della Pilotta in Parma is preparing to host 'Time, Past, Present, Future,' the largest permanent work created in Italy by Maurizio Nannucci.

Parma ’s Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta is preparing to host a permanent work by Maurizio Nannucci (Florence, 1939), one of Italy’s leading contemporary artists, famous worldwide for his work with neon. And in neon is also the work coming to the city of Emilia: Time, Past, Present and Future in fact consists of 190 meters (and 55 letters) of neon made of Murano glass, which will give new light to the heritage of the complex. The work won the fourth edition of theItalian Council, the ministerial project created to promote the production and knowledge ofItalian contemporary art, and will be placed in the sides of the courtyard of San Pietro, inside the Pilotta.

Its size makes it the largest permanent work created by Nannucci in Italy: his intent is to create a bridge between the past of the Pilotta Complex and its present, between ancient and contemporary art, between the exterior and the interior of the building. “A democratic project by nature,” reads a note, “that returns the fundamental value of art to the community, involving passers-by and making them participants in the heritage that surrounds them and the riches preserved inside the Complex.”

The opening of Time, Past, Present and Future is set for Friday, Nov. 22 from 4:30 p.m. The event will be accompanied by a musical performance by Lillevan, a Berlin-based video artist invited by Nannucci himself, with artistic advice from Lenz Fondazione. The performance, entitled Eventually Elusive, will be performed in dialogue with Nannucci’s work. Again, before the opening in Parma, a newspaper made for the occasion will be distributed free of charge, in ten thousand copies, with texts by Simone Verde, Annalisa Rimmaudo and a reflection by the artist with Gabriele Detterer. On the same days the newspaper will also be distributed at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, the Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and the MAXXI in Rome.

Maurizio Nannucci, as anticipated, is one of the protagonists of Italian art in recent decades, known internationally Since the mid-1960s he has been exploring the complex relationships between art, language and image, creating unprecedented conceptual proposals characterized by the use of different media: neon, photography, video, sound, editions and artist’s books. His research, which has always been open to dialogue between different disciplines, explores the relationship between light, color, sound, and real and imagined space, which becomes particularly evident in his large neon writings, such as those created on the facade of the Uffizi in Florence, the Altes Museum in Berlin, the Lenbachhaus in Munich, and recently the Maxxi in Rome. In a career spanning more than fifty years, he has collaborated and realized projects with Renzo Piano and other architects such as Massimiliano Fuksas, Mario Botta, Nicolas Grimshaw, and Stephan Braunfels. He has been invited several times to the Venice Biennale, Documenta in Kassel, the So Paulo, Sydney, and Istanbul Biennales and has exhibited in major museums and galleries around the world.

Maurizio Nannucci's largest permanent work ever in Italy arrives at Parma's Pilotta
Maurizio Nannucci's largest permanent work ever in Italy arrives at Parma's Pilotta